Carolina BBQ… Beach Road Pit Stop Heaven

Kenansville, North Carolina-

When traveling through historic Kenansville, North Carolina byway of NC Hwy 24 just off I-40 East make sure to make Carolina BBQ your lunch or dinner destination!

Wonderful Eastern North Carolina style BBQ and Seafood Buffet

My husband and I were recently traveling through on our way to the Crystal Coast of NC, when our tummies started rumbling and we made it our mission to seek out a good ole Eastern NC barbecue spot to quench our soul food Sunday craving.

Well, I can tell you we were thrilled to happen upon this awesome restaurant.

It has all the makings of your grandparents’ Sunday dinner table— pork barbecue, fried chicken, fried shrimp and flounder, chicken and pastries, collards, lima beans, Brunswick stew, sweet tea, banana pudding, hush puppies— you get the drift.

If you are in need of comfort food, this is your spot.

Not to mention, the staff go out of their way to make you feel welcome and satisfied with your visit.

Ample seating in the spacious dining room

This kind fellow, Jimmy (pictured below), went out of his way to greet two unfamiliar faces and make them feel a part of the Carolina BBQ community.

He instantly connected with us and took time to learn of the new folks wandering in on a late Sunday afternoon.

He was congenial, kind and quite the conversationalist— told us stories of days long ago when he served in the US Marine Corps, his retirement from the state of North Carolina as a probation officer and his pride of his wife and daughter who are both doctors.

Southern hospitality at its finest.

Thanks, Jimmy. You made our visit even more of a delight.

If you find yourself near Kenansville, go ahead and set your GPS to direct you straight to the door of Carolina BBQ and Seafood.

Good news… there is a second location of Carolina BBQ in Wilmington, NC too!

You will be living high on the hog if you give this barbecue joint a try.

-Alison Paul Klakowicz, BA, MS

Author of Mommy’s Big, Red Monster Truck

http://www.alisonpaulklakowicz.com

Podcast: anchor.fm/jalisonpaulyahoocom

Instagram @alisonklak

Twitter @KlakowiczAlison

Alison Paul Klakowicz is an Eastern North Carolina native, children’s book author, blogger, podcaster and creative writer. She is a military spouse who resides in Fayetteville, NC with her husband, Adam, and son, Mak.

Joann Yost: Gold Star Wife, Breast Cancer Survivor, Mother, Business Woman, Guiding Light

Joann “JoJo” Yost, Perruque Boutique Founder and Owner

Take a LISTEN to our inspiring, and motivational conversation on Hodge Podge Podcast here: https://anchor.fm/jalisonpaulyahoocom/episodes/Joann-JoJo-Yost-Survivor–Warrior–Inspiration-e4d7ol

Fayetteville, North Carolina

Perruque Boutique Owner and Founder, Joann “JoJo” Yost, came up with the vision of her business while sitting in a chemo chair while fighting her own battle with stage two breast cancer in 2015.

https://www.wigsfayettevillenc.com/

Photographs of JoJo’s breast cancer treatment journey

Her mission: to make Fayetteville, North Carolina and its surrounding areas feel beautiful one WIG at a time.

JoJo assisting a customer choosing a wig due to hair loss from chemotherapy

Various high quality wigs, headscarves and accessories available for sale at Perruque

Private wig fitting rooms available allow customers privacy

Not only is JoJo a breast cancer survivor, but she is also a Gold Star Spouse. 🌟

https://www.goldstarwives.org/.

Her late husband, US Army Special Forces MSG Anthony Yost, was killed in action during a deployment in Iraq in 2005. He was the love of her life and father to their son, AJ, who was a toddler when his father passed away.

United States Army Special Forces MSG Anthony Yost

Anthony and JoJo

https://www.greenberetfoundation.org/memorial/anthony-r-c-yost/ https://www.fallenheroesproject.org/united-states/anthony-ray-charles-yost/

I had the pleasure to sit down with this extraordinary woman and chat about her struggles and triumphs after surviving her husband‘s death in combat, her transition to single-parenting, then beating breast cancer which inspired her to open her own business in order to create a safe harbor for others fighting for their lives— to provide them hope and help them feel beautiful on their journey.

Take a LISTEN to our inspiring, and motivational conversation on Hodge Podge Podcast here: https://anchor.fm/jalisonpaulyahoocom/episodes/Joann-JoJo-Yost-Survivor–Warrior–Inspiration-e4d7ol

-Alison Paul Klakowicz, BA, MS

Author of Mommy’s Big, Red Monster Truck

http://www.alisonpaulklakowicz.com

Podcast: anchor.fm/jalisonpaulyahoocom

Instagram @alisonklak

Twitter @KlakowiczAlison

Alison Paul Klakowicz is an Eastern North Carolina native, children’s book author, blogger, podcaster and creative writer. She is a military spouse who resides in Fayetteville, NC with her husband, Adam, and son, Mak.

Cumberland County Public Library: Local Author Showcase

Fayetteville, North Carolina-

Trinity Bursey, Children’s Book Author

From Children’s Books to Science Fiction, Romance to Fantasy, Creative Writing Anthologies to Spiritual Inspiration, Poetry to Memoirs, Mystery to Anime Enthusiasts, Fiction to Non-Fiction, Cumberland County authors span all genres of literature.

On Saturday, June 15, 2019, Cumberland County Public Library Headquarters location downtown Fayetteville, NC, hosted the annual Local Authors Showcase where talented area writers groups and authors were invited to display their published books in an effort to bring attention to the growing writers community here in the Sandhills.

Alison Paul Klakowicz, Author of Mommy’s Big, Red Monster Truck

I was honored to be a part of this event alongside fellow authors and local writers groups in an effort to support my peers, educate myself on local writer’s resources as well as display my children’s travel and adventure picture book, Mommy’s Big, Red Monster Truck: http://www.alisonpaulklakowicz.com

Fantasy Fiction Novelist Rebecca Lang

The vast amount of literature created by Cumberland County residents is impressive. I was taken aback by the fortitude and lyrical artistry of the authors featured at this year’s event.

Jack Welsh and Lorraina Nyanza- Veteran Memoirists

I found myself walking around the Pate Room of Headquarters Library in awe of each of the individuals I met— who poured their heart and soul into creating meaningful, poignant and entertaining prose.

Members of Off the Page Writers Group and contributors to The Mayor’s Tales anthology

Writing can at times be a lonely walk. So it was wonderful to be a part of an event that connected individuals such as myself with one another in order to nourish fellowship and support.

Donald Kemp, Novelist
Robin Minnick, Novelist

Networking with other writers and bookish enthusiasts in the community is crucial in spreading the word about the wonderful people and resources here in Fayetteville.

Talicia Smith, Poet and Spiritual Devotionals

Vivian Boylorn, Poet

Roberta J. Humphries, Inspirational Novelist and Memoirist
Steve Kamradt, Memoir

It was wonderful to see folks of different backgrounds, cultures and experiences gather in one room with the same objective and passion to educate the public on the local literature available to them.

Patricia Blanks, Christian Studies

Elaine J. Martin, Barking Dog Press

Sarah McCormick, Novelist

David & Sara Rothman, Anime/Manga/Japanese Culture Enthusiasts and Novelists

Even better to witness the inclusion and opportunity to share our own unique areas of interest and expertise with one another as well as event visitors.

Members of Chosen Pen Writing Group

Video courtesy of Cumberland County Public Library:

Kathleen Wanamaker, Fantasy Novelist

I encourage Cumberland County residents to attend next year’s event at the library and encourage you to seek out local authors for your next book purchase and schedule an author event at your school or venue.

There are some very talented individuals right here in our community that would greatly appreciate your support!

You can check out books from the Local Author Section at the library. For more information check here: http://www.cumberland.lib.nc.us/ccplicinfo/mobile_website/m.homepage.html

-Alison Paul Klakowicz, BA, MS

Author of Mommy’s Big, Red Monster Truck

http://www.alisonpaulklakowicz.com

Podcast: anchor.fm/jalisonpaulyahoocom

Instagram @alisonklak

Twitter @KlakowiczAlison

Alison Paul Klakowicz is an Eastern North Carolina native, children’s book author, blogger, podcaster and creative writer. She is a military spouse who resides in Fayetteville, NC with her husband, Adam, and son, Mak.

My Captain, My Father

“Ah this is a yacht ! She’ll not give you gold nor glory, but only the song of taut rigging, the tang of salt spray, and the freedom and adventure of the sea

My dad, Joseph Allen Paul, celebrated seventy-two grand years on this Earth this past February.

Seventy-Two years. 😲

How could this be? Where have the years gone?

Are we truly getting this OLD? 👵🏻 Surely not.

But, YES.

It is true.

Seven decades have passed him by. And I am blessed to have shared four of those cherished seven.

Time is so odd. Things that feel like just yesterday are now days long ago— the good old days as some would say.

I wish we could go back and relive some of those beautiful memories. Especially from the earliest years of my life…

Someone call The Doctor! I need a Tardis.

Ah, but time travel is fiction, and those days are behind us now. We’ve evolved into the here and now which isn’t a bad place to be.

Dad’s been retired now for twenty years.

TWENTY YEARS.

For thirty loyal years, he worked for the state of North Carolina— beginning as a high school math teacher, and later building a career in the juvenile justice field as a Court Counselor and retired as a Chief Court Counselor with the judicial system.

Of course, retirement did not slow him down one bit. He’s the hardest working retired man I know.

I cannot even fathom to understand what it must feel like to have accomplished so much, and to have lived seventy-two years to tell about it.

My son who is seven will only know my dad as his ever faithful grandfather whom he affectionately calls “Poppy.”

The man whom I’m convinced loves my son more than all of us combined. The man who would do just about anything in the world to be with his grandson any day or any time… at the drop of a hat. The man who adores him, and hangs on my son’s every word.

The man who calls him on the phone just to say, “Hey, Mak!” To which my son replies, “What, Poppy?” My dad will pause to increase suspense— even though we all know exactly what he’s going to say because we’ve heard it what seems to be a million times— and he will finally reply with mischief and enthusiasm, “You’re Awesome!”

A true and real bond those two share. I hope my son knows deep down in his heart one day how lucky he is to have a Poppy in his life.

But I want my son to know my dad has a story too. He was once a little boy with parents and grandparents.

I want to make sure he knows at least some of his maternal grandfather’s story and hope he takes a little pride in knowing whom and from where he came.

So here are some things I’d like him to know:

My dad was born February 25, 1947, a post World War II baby boomer. The son of a United States Navy Sailor, the late Joseph Bell Paul, who married his sweetheart and moved back home to Beaufort County, North Carolina to start a family following a wild journey with the Navy on a minesweeper up and down the United States East Coast; across the Pacific Ocean by way of Australia and New Guinea— onto Japan to witness the signing of the Peace Treaty in Tokyo Bay.

My grandmother, the late Georgia Cutler Paul, a loving, kind, smart and faithful Christian woman grew up in Gilead Shores, a ten minute boat ride up the river from Core Point. My grandmother attended East Carolina Teachers College in the early 1940s, but left college to pursue work in Washington, DC with the Department of Labor to support the war effort and later became engaged to and married my grandfather.

When my father’s parents settled back home in North Carolina, they moved into a small, white cottage on the beautiful and beseeching shores of the historic Pamlico River at Core Point—directly across from historic Bath, the oldest town in NC best known for housing the infamous pirate Blackbeard back in the 1700s.

My grandfather was raised in Core Point and told Tom Sawyerish tales of his Depression era youth spent on the banks of the river.

The little cottage was my father’s first home where he lived his first years of life and fell in love with the Pamlico River’s estuarine tide and boating. And the place he played “cowboys and Indians” among the dirt byway of Old Schoolhouse Road and tobacco fields with childhood friends.

When my dad was a bit older, my grandfather built a new home about a half mile inland on Core Point Road and opened a small country store on adjacent land directly in front of their home.

On one side of the storefront was a typical small market where they sold goods of all types to include food (fresh eggs, milk, sugar), toiletries (to include Rose Oil and Pomade by the loads), and any other household items a person might have required back in the 1950s.

The other side of the cinderblock building was a small mechanics workshop where my grandfather worked on cars and repaired television 📺 sets.

My daddy spent a great deal of his youth helping his parents out in the store and eavesdropping on all the gossip told by the local folks who gathered about like a town hall meeting to enjoy a Pepsi Cola and a pack of Nabs— and fellowship.

There were juicier stories from the store he shared with me. One of which had to do with some suspected moonshiners who placed large orders of sugar for purchase from my grandfather, but that’s a story for another time and place. 🌝 Nothing to see or hear here folks. Move along. 😲

On my dad’s ninth birthday, he received a very special gift— a baby brother by the name of Michael Alvin Paul. Who would have thought two brothers born on the same day nine years apart? But this seems to run in the family as I shared the same birthday with my late great-grandmother Sadie (on Dad’s side) and my son and husband share a birthday as well. Go figure?

My dad was the proud big brother of a tiny little fella who he said they all loved dearly. The same little brother who grew up to be an attorney then elected judge and now a retired, former North Carolina Superior Court Judge.

The brothers still meet for weekly lunches at the local Pizza Hut in Washington, NC or at my uncle’s farm where he recently added two donkeys and some chickens, a red barn to be used as an art studio for my talented Aunt Penny and a Dalmatian named Beau Henry.

When my grandparents were still living, every year our families (to include my mom, Julia Beth, brother Austin, my Uncle Mike, Aunt Penny and cousins Mike and Katie), met at my grandparents rural, country home to celebrate the Paul boy’s birthday with a Sunday lunch.

I can still smell the collards and hear the pressure cooker whistling and taste the handmade biscuits with a wedge of butter and sweet tea.

Look at my cousins Katie and Little Mike. So cute. They are all grown up now. Little Mike is the proud dad to two super cute boys, Rylan and Liam.

Pictures of the prodigal sons and accolades hung from the dark, wood paneled walls of my grandparent’s home. Their pride in their sons’ achievements was ten fold.

My parents met when my mom— a cute and spunky, blue-eyed, blonde haired farmer’s daughter — was a fourteen-year-old Freshmen at Aurora High School.

My dad was an upperclassman Junior, who Mom recalls was slim, handsome and well-dressed. She recounted he always wore slacks, a nicely pressed collared shirt and a shiny pair of Weejuns. My dad said he bought my mom a honey bun at snack time at AHS for their first date and then every day after.

Here they are dressed up for Christmas at my mom’s parents, the late Marvin and Julia Mae Austin’s, home in the late 1960s.

My dad didn’t just love a good looking blonde, he’s also always had a thing for a cool car.

My grandfather always made sure dad had a sharp ride when he was coming up. His first car was a classic 1953 Studebaker Champion pictured below with his proud baby brother, Michael, posing by his big brother’s fancy red ride.

For his Senior year graduation 🎓 his parents gave him a Chevy Malibu to drive while he attended college in Wilson, NC at what was known then as Atlantic Christian College.

He joined a fraternity—Sigma Phi Epsilon— and majored in Mathematics and minored in Physics. Unfortunately, I did not inherit his math and engineering genes.

It was there at ACC, he studied diligently but made room for some fun too. He and my mother would attend parties and Shag to the harmonious and soulful sounds of Carolina Beach Music band favorites such as The Embers (whose frontman Craig Woolard is my father’s cousin), and classic Motown and R&B bands like The Tams and The Drifters.

They saw Little Stevie Wonder live in concert in Wilson during those college years and will never forget watching the young man play his harmonica with tenacity, confidence and a soulful flow.

In the summers when he came home from school, my father worked at the new and industrious phosphate mine then known as Texasgulf nearby his home community in Aurora, NC. His father had since closed the country store some years prior to become a welder at the mine plant where he later retired as a foreman overseeing the plants welding operations.

It was during one of those first college summers home Dad found a prehistoric fossilized tree stump, and a Megalodon Sharks Tooth while working inside the mine pit. He also built his very first wooden sailboat which would be the first of many boats he would build in his life.

Dad is a master carpenter, a skill passed on to him and his brother from their dad— and a skill passed on to my brother. Dad put those skills to good use and built several homes over the years from the ground up and restored many others all in his spare time.

In the late 1970s and early 1980s, he owned and operated a small sailboat building business in Aurora, NC. He did this during the evenings when he’d return home from Washington, NC after working his state job during the day. He poured fiberglass hulls and pieced the boats together and sold hundreds of boats to sailing enthusiasts from California way up the North East United States Coast.

If someone were to ask me the scent of my father, I would say my dad smells of juniper and sawdust. My earliest memories of him are flooded with the sound of a table saw and tiny bits of wood fluttering about him like golden powder. It is a sound and smell that takes me back to the safest and simplest of times.

Sea spray and the rocking motion of a center-consul, flat-bottom boat also conjure up the essence of my father.

He is an old salt.

The sea runs through his veins as it does mine. My mother jokes I was most likely conceived on a sailboat in the river’s tide.

My parents married soon after my father’s graduation from college in June of 1969 and moved back home to Aurora. I will mention that in a couple of weeks, they will celebrate their 50th WEDDING ANNIVERSARY! They deserve an award 🥇 for this amazing event!

They eventually found themselves living happy as larks in a tiny river cottage off Main Street at the dead end of the road by South Creek.

A small canal came up by the cottage where they conveniently parked their sailboat (built by my dad). After they settled into their simple life on the creek, their family expanded to three.

The little cottage on the creek was my very first home.

A year after I was born, my dad and his father built my parent’s dream home on Grace Drive in Aurora, a small subdivision that cornered on fertile farm land.

Our neighbors next door to us were former Aurora mayor, Frank Bonner and his beautiful wife, Mrs. Grace. Across the street was the Peed family whose daughter, Kimberly became my first best friend. And my Sunday School teacher, Mrs. Layla and her family lived just up the street not to mention many other family friends.

My mom taught play school for neighboring children in the mornings out of an upstairs loft in our new home while my dad made the commute to Washington, NC each day for work.

A year later, my baby brother Austin was born. Our family of four was complete. There are some sweet memories from those years in our home in the small, rural farming community.

We knew just about everyone and everything going on. It was safe enough for me to ride my bike at the age of eight to the convenience store to buy milk for my mom.

Small town life was surely special.

My dad served on the Aurora Town Council and my mom served terms as Vice-President and President of the Aurora Junior Women’s Club.

We loved our church family and attended services weekly at Aurora Methodist Church.

We were always in the community parades, and one year my family dressed as clowns and rode in a classic Ford Model A my dad restored.

It was a wonderful life.

When we weren’t on the river, we spent our summers at my family’s sound-side beach cottage (built by my dad, grandfather and uncle) in the Outer Banks of North Carolina in Avon not far from Cape Hatteras.

The cottage— a simple, three bedroom on piling with a perfect deck overlooking the wide, circular canal that led out to the vast Pamlico Sound.

My dad would drive our family up and down the sound’s shores in the boat. The thrill of a treasure hunt was instilled in us as stingrays and sea turtles swam along with us on our Pamlico Sound journeys.

We found antique bottles and arrowheads along the shore and even found a forgotten graveyard being washed out to sea. Relics of days past and haunted shores were magical for my brother and me.

There was no better feeling than sunburnt exhaustion from a day of driving the old Chevy Blazer— rod and reel holders mounted to the front bumper— out onto the beach sand, setting up camp for a day of surf fishing, ocean swimming and rolling down sand dunes the size of small mountains.

I’m quite certain these experiences inspired my brother’s longing for and appreciation of nature and the outdoors as he is a career North Carolina State Park Ranger.

The summer before I began my Fourth Grade year, my family left our home in Aurora and moved 45 minutes West to the “big city” of Little Washington, NC in an effort to shorten my dad’s commute and the advantages of a larger town’s resources and school system.

We moved into our new home— built by my dad and grandfather— off River Road in Sweetbriar where we embraced the challenges and excitement of a new life.

We spent many years afterward in the Washington area where my brother and I graduated from Washington High School. My brother graduated from Appalachian State University to begin his trek as a Park Ranger and mountain man. I returned for a few years to Washington after graduation from East Carolina University and worked as a general assignment newspaper reporter for Washington Daily News and went on to work as a social worker for the county’s department of social services.

Around this time my dad retired and spent his newfound freedom building his and my mom’s retirement home on the banks of the Pamlico River at Core Point where he was raised.

Several years later, Mom retired from the school system after 20 years of dedication working in the county elementary schools as a Teacher’s Aide, Librarian Assistant, Front Office Assistant, and as the school system’s Maintenance Department as a lead Administrative Assistant.

Since their retirement, they haven’t looked back.

Their days have been filled with Pamlico River sunset cruises and coffee on the screened porch overlooking golden sunrises. Watching the dolphin 🐬 swim in packs by the pier, and the heron and bald eagles hunt their breakfast and dinner.

My mother has documented most of their days with her gorgeous photographs of river life. She’s quite talented and has an eye for capturing its beauty.

They know every inch of the watershed and joyfully cruise up and down the river waters and it’s nooks and crannies knowing they have come back home full-circle.

I am so proud of all they have accomplished and the life they’ve designed for our family to grow and share together.

It makes me gush to watch them teach my boy of the beautiful river life that is such a deep set part of us all.

Although he could not do it without my mom’s help, support and patience of a saint (JuJu, you know you are the bomb and Poppy would be lost without you!) we have my dad to thank for bringing it all to life.

It was his vision.

His preparation, planning and hard work that brought this home on the river to be.

I should note Poppy is also a bit of a philosopher and intellectual. He loves to tell a good story and enjoys an audience.

He’s read every Lee Child novel.

He can recite parts of The Canterbury Tales on command.

He does an excellent Popeye and Wimpy impression.

He loves to sing, and belts out “The House of the Rising Sun” or fervently renders the ballad “Here’s to the Land of the Longleaf Pine” at any given chance.

He also loves a classic car. Here he is below with his British Racing Green MG and a photo of the TR-3 he restored.

James Bond is his hero.

And although he can have a loud bark at times, he is a big softie with heart who loves his family most of all.

Dad is our biggest fan and the one who loses sleep worrying about us.

He is our captain on land and at sea.

Our father.

Poppy.

Dad, although our politics differs at times there is one thing we can definitely agree on… that our life has been blessed, good and rich in experiences, and unconditional love.

Thank you for always loving us with all of you, for worrying over us, supporting us and making it the best life we could possibly have.

They don’t make many men like you.

There is one last thing I want to say.

Hey Poppy…

You’re Awesome!

Your loving daughter,

Alison

-Alison Paul Klakowicz, BA, MS

Author of Mommy’s Big, Red Monster Truck

http://www.alisonpaulklakowicz.com

Podcast: anchor.fm/jalisonpaulyahoocom

Instagram @alisonklak

Twitter @KlakowiczAlison

Alison Paul Klakowicz is an Eastern North Carolina native, children’s book author, blogger, podcaster and creative writer. She is a military spouse who resides in Fayetteville, NC with her husband, Adam, and son, Mak.

A Very Merry Time @ Sweet Tea Shakespeare

Why, then the world ’s mine oyster,
Which I with sword will open…”
-William Shakespeare

Fayetteville, North Carolina-

Sweet Tea Shakespeare continues to place a refreshing spin on centuries old theatre in the heart of historic Fayetteville, North Carolina as witnessed at the Sunday, June 9, 2019 performance of The Merry Wives of Windsor.

Due to a deluge of rain showers, the play was held indoors at St. Michael the Archangel Maronite Church, which is directly next door to Museum of the Cape Fear Complex https://museumofthecapefear.ncdcr.gov/ (the usual outdoor venue on-site at the historic Poe House) and made for an extremely convenient alternate location for the performance.

https://www.stmichaelsmaronite.net/

Delicious refreshments were served including an assortment of beverages including water, wine, beer, and the signature sweet (and unsweetened) tea.

Guests were also offered mouth watering barbecue from Blackstone Smokehouse & Pub: http://blackstonesmokehouse.squarespace.com/

Plentiful as well as comfortable seating was abundant… I do love attention to detail especially when it comes to my derrière.

I t hank you.

The troupe makes a colossal mark on its audience fueled with vigor and fortitude,

humor and passion,

and talent.

The troupe even includes audience members in the act…. and these ladies did not disappoint.

Sweet Tea Shakespeare cast also know how to party…

Who doesn’t love a good party?

The Merry Wives of Windsor is a MUST SEE.

You will laugh— a lot.

You will be inspired by lessons of humanity that never seem to change throughout the ages.

You will have a delightful experience that will put you instantly in a better state of mind and soul.

Purchase your tickets here for the next performance as you will be supporting a local treasure (and, you will LOVE watching them perform): http://www.sweetteashakespeare.com/

-Alison Paul Klakowicz, BA, MS

Author of Mommy’s Big, Red Monster Truck

http://www.alisonpaulklakowicz.com

Podcast: anchor.fm/jalisonpaulyahoocom

Instagram @alisonklak

Twitter @KlakowiczAlison

Alison Paul Klakowicz is a North Carolina native, children’s book author, blogger, podcaster and creative writer. She is a military spouse who resides in Fayetteville, NC with her husband, Adam, and son, Mak.

Old Mill of Guilford: A Step Back in Time

Old Mill of Guilford— an HISTORIC FULLY OPERATIONAL, WATER-POWERED, 18TH CENTURY GRIST MILL— has become a favorite pit stop of my family when traveling through quaint Oak Ridge, North Carolina on our way to visit my brother, a North Carolina State Park Ranger at Hanging Rock State Park.

Once we leave the beaten path of the interstate behind us, we are eager for a hiatus and there is no better place than Old Mill of Guilford.

We love to seek refuge on the grounds of Old Mill of Guilford and tour the mill that allows its guests a peak inside the treasured North Carolina historical landmark and business.

Upon arrival, guests are greeted by a rustic, covered porch lined with rockers, a handmade wooden, plank bench and a few charming antiquities….

as well as a resident calico cat.

The front door of the mill stays ajar during spring and summer to welcome a stray breeze and visitors to enter the heart of the small mill of yore’s daily operations.

My seven-year-old son is fascinated by the idea of water funneled in from a nearby watershed powers the machinery.

For parents seeking educational opportunities for their kiddos during the summer months, this is a great way to share a lesson on engineering, food production and North Carolina history.

Off to the right of the mill’s main floor is a glass window paned, white, wooden framed door, decorated with hundreds of handwritten names of previous customers to the onsite mill store.

Visitors can peruse the cache of Old Mill of Guilford Stone Ground products as well as other locally made goods.

We’ve grown quite fond of the Buttermilk and Apple Cinnamon Pancake Mixes which are perfect for a weekend, family breakfast. 🥞

My son (and friends) enjoy putting their tooth fairy money to use by purchasing bars of local, handmade scented soaps 🧼 and a piece of candy 🍬 or two.

The mill store uses an oldtimey cash register which is a great conversation starter, and endearing relic of days gone by.

The mill’s grounds are a perfect stage for an al fresco lunch while overlooking the old sky-high footbridge over the creek, and bright, red-painted carriage wheel fencing.

According to the company website: https://oldmillofguilford.com/

“Mill of Guilford was founded in North Carolina on Beaver Creek in 1767 to grind grain for the early settlers of what is now Guilford County. Today, the mill continues to produce all-natural, stone-ground, whole grain foods, just as it has for over 240 years.

The Mill produces all natural corn meal, grits and flour along with a wide range of mixes including:  Gingerbread Mixes, Muffin Mixes, Pancake Mixes, Cookie Mixes, Scone Mixes, Biscuit Mixes and Hushpuppy Mix.  The Mill’s signature mix is the Sweet Potato Muffin. Visit the Old Mill Store for these products and other fine foods and crafts from North Carolina.”

If interested in visiting Old Mill of Guilford, look here:

Old Mill of Guilford is a wonderful byway stop worthy of your time, rich in history and peaceful landscapes of which my family has come to love.

-Alison Paul Klakowicz, BA, MS

Author of Mommy’s Big, Red Monster Truck

http://www.alisonpaulklakowicz.com

https://www.amazon.com/Mommys-Big-Red-Monster-Truck/dp/1525530178

anchor.fm/jalisonpaulyahoocom

Instagram @alisonklak

Twitter @KlakowiczAlison

Alison Paul Klakowicz is a North Carolina native, children’s book author, blogger, podcaster and creative writer. She is a military spouse who resides in Fayetteville, NC with her husband, Adam, and son, Mak.